「アフリカのプリント布」に関する視点

We are in Amsterdam for reasons...

We are in Amsterdam for reasons?!

(英語のあと日本語)

Today I want to briefly talk about the African prints. There are many things we can talk about African textiles but I want to start from the African wax print, which is also known as Ankara or Dutch wax and is 100% cotton wax print with (typically) colorful and dynamic patterns.

Why is it called Dutch wax? It is because it has been brought by Dutch people. While there are always ambiguities in how cultural exchanges happen over the course of history, it is said that the origin of the wax print is Indonesian batik.

In 19th Century, Dutch traders “found” batik textiles in Indonesia and began to industrialize the textiles to make it more affordable and expand businesses. Machine-made “batik” wasn’t well-received in the Indonesian market and consequently, West Africa was chosen for the new market.

Fast forward, Dutch wax has gained popularity in West Africa (and also in the other parts of Africa), and to this day, the Dutch-based company Vlisco Group (currently owned by British private equity firm Actis. / The group also owns West Africa-based textile brands including Woodin and GTP.) is the leading company in African prints and 90% of their business consists of the export to the African market.

While Dutch wax is generally considered “local” and celebrated and loved by locals in the context of African fashion & design, there are some artists that try to bring alternative views. For example, British-born Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare often uses Dutch wax to present his political pieces to highlight the colonial past.

One of the key pieces is called “Scramble of Africa. It is a sculptural piece with headless men wearing Dutch wax centered around the table. It is “a recreation of the Berlin conference in the 19th century…It was when Africa was being divided up. It was in Europe. They had this conference in Berlin. And the conference was called Scramble for Africa. So on the table there’s a map of Africa drawn. So it’s merely capturing a moment when all these brainless people got around the table — headless, brainless — to actually divide up the spoils amongst themselves. See if they have original entitlements to it.” Yinka on Chris Boyds Blog

Is Vlisco is a bad guy? No. We think that it is just another successful textile global company.
Is Vlisco our competitor? Yes, maybe. From the perspective of “African” textile industry, we cannot ignore Vlisco. In fact, Vlisco could be a partner.

Are we envisioning to become another Vlisco? No…
But it is probably not the coincident that we are now in Amsterdam presenting an alternative African perspective using textile art…


アフリカのプリント布についてちょっと書いてみようと思います。アフリカの布といってもいろいろとあるのですが、今回は、アンカラやダッチワックスなどとも呼ばれる、綿100%で(通常)カラフルで大胆な柄が全面にプリントされた、アフリカのワックスプリントの布です。

ダッチワックスと呼ばれているのは、オランダ人が展開に寄与しているからです。文化がどのように交わって、互いに影響を受けてきたかという歴史的な事実には常に1つの解は存在していないように思いますが、知られているルーツとしては、ダッチワックスはインドネシアのバティックが元となっているようです。

19世紀、交易ルート拡大していたオランダ人が、インドネシアでバティックを「見つけ、」自国で工業化して安くインドネシアに輸出しようとしたのですが、インドネシア市場では惨敗となり、新たな市場として開拓されたのが西アフリカでした。

早送りして、ダッチワックスは、西アフリカを中心にアフリカで非常にポピュラーな布となっています。現在も、オランダに拠点をもつヴリスコグループ(イギリスのPEファンドActisの傘下。西アフリカ拠点のWoodinやGTPなども参加にある)が、アフリカプリントのマーケットリーダーであり、そのビジネスの90%は西・中央アフリカなどへの輸出となっています。

語弊(誤解?)の内容に申し上げておくと、ダッチワックスは、一般的にローカルなものとしてアフリカ市場に受け入れられており、アフリカの現地の人々やディアスポラたちに愛され、サポートされています。ただ、一部のアーティストなどは、違う考え方も提示しています。例えば、イギリス生まれのナイジェリア人アーティストは、ダッチワックスを多用し、植民地支配の過去に触れたような、政治的なメッセージを含む作品なども発表しています。

例えば「アフリカ分割」という作品が代表的です。ダッチワックスのスーツに身を包んだ、頭の部分がない男達が、テーブルを囲んでいる作品です。この作品は「19世紀のベルリン会議を再現したものです。つまり、アフリカの分割が話し合われた会議です。ヨーロッパのベルリンで行われた会議です。この会議の名前がアフリカ分割だったわけです。テーブルにはアフリカの地図がおかれていて、頭の部分がない人々ーつまり脳みそが欠けている人がーが、お互いの欲求のままに領土分割を行っているのです。そもそもそんな権利があるのか。。。」Yinka on Chris Boyds Blog

ヴリスコは悪か?そうは思いません。グローバルに成功しているテキスタイルカンパニーの一つと捕えています。

ヴリスコは競合か。おそらく。アフリカンテキスタイルという観点から見れば無視できません。もしかしたらパートナーかもしれませんが。

我々は、ヴリスコを目指しているのか。たぶん違うような気がします。

しかし、今アムステルダムで、テキスタイルアートを使ったアフリカの新たな視点を提案しようとしている試みは、ただの偶然ではないことは確かでしょう。